It happened in the Mearns

Our picture from the past this week was given to us by Margaret Ross, and shows Woodcot nursing staff bidding a fond farewell as five of their colleagues retired.
Taken around 1984, Mragaret's mother,  Margaret Scott (second right) is one of the ladies who retired.
Our picture from the past this week was given to us by Margaret Ross, and shows Woodcot nursing staff bidding a fond farewell as five of their colleagues retired. Taken around 1984, Mragaret's mother, Margaret Scott (second right) is one of the ladies who retired.

We take a look back at what was making the headlines locally on this day in 1992, 1967 and 1917.

25 YEARS AGO

Friday March 13th, 1992

Work began this week on a Scottish Office plan to create a “flyover” on the Stonehaven bypass using Broomhill Road bridge and a controversial looped access road through Kirktown of Fetteresso, despite widespread local opposition to the scheme.

At a meeting in the Town Hall on Monday, an action group was set up to fight the £600,000 proposal, which also includes the closure of the central reservation access at Spurryhillock junction accident blackspot.

More than 20 people attended Monday’s meeting, convened by Stonehaven Community Council, after 150 people had unanimously rejected the plan at a public meeting in mackie Academy last week.

Six people agreed to form a committee to lead the pressure group’s campaign. And their first action was to write this week to Scottish minister, Lord James Douglas-Hamilton MP, asking him to defer implementation of the scheme.

But on Wednesday, Grampian Regional Council’s roads department, acting as agents for the Scottish Office, began work on improvements to the Fetteresso Cemetery road on the West of the bypass. And once this “loop road” is upgraded, probably at the end of the month, the central reservation at Spurryhillock will be stopped up.

Many people propose the scheme is both cheap and inadequate, and will merely shift the problem elsewhere.

50 YEARS AGO

Friday March 17th 1967

Congestion in Laurencekirk High Street, which was said to be mainly due to parking on both sides, was discussed at the monthly meeting of Laurencekirk Town Council last Thursday night, but it was decided to do nothing about it until adequate parking facilities are available.

Reporting on a meeting of the streets and roads committee, Councillor R. Blyth, convenor, said that one or two suggestions had been put forward by his committee. They included parking in stretches of 150 yards on one side of the road alternately, but after discussion they had agreed that the Chief Constable might be asked to come into the matter.

They all knew about the congestion. At certain times of the day, particularly between 4pm and 5pm, and on Saturday mornings, it was a real business to get up and down the High Street. On Saturday mornings it took eight or nine minutes to get along the length of the street, and the situation would get worse as more cars came on the road.

Councillor Blyth’s suggestion was not accepted by the council, who had a sneaking regard to shopkeeper’s needs, especially so far as unloading goods is concerned.

The real solution, of course, will be the provision of the talk-of bypass - but that is very much in the future.

100 YEARS AGO

Thursday March 15th 1917

On Friday evening the committee of the Kinneff, Catterline, and Barras Charity held a second concert in the Catterline Hall.

There was a very large attendance, the commodius hall being well filled. The proceedings were of a most enthusiastic character, and everything passed off without a hitch.

The Rev. M. E. Carrington, of the Catterline Episcopal Church, presided. There could not be a better object than that - to help their own people (applause). He was glad that this money was to be adminstered locally, so that suitable cases should receive the benefit of it.

The Chairman said that before the concert began, he would like to remind them what the object was, together with that held in Kinneff recently. As perhaps most of them knew, the sum already raised was over £150, and the committee hoped that evening would add to that. The amount raised was larger than had been expected, and it had therefore been agreed to give £20 to the Scottish Red Cross Society, and £20 to St Leonard’s Hospital, Stonehaven. The balance was to be used for the comfort of local soldiers - men from their own parish who were in need of a little help possibly when they came home, and during the time they were obtaining work, and also to help those who had been wounded. He understood there were 60 men in training or at the front.