It happened in the Mearns

This week's Picture from the Past comes from the Leader archives of March 1992.
It shows Arduthie Primary School P1 pupils after they successfully hatched chickens in an incubator and then house them in an improvised run.
They are named l-r as Alison Emslie, Sophie Hunt, Karen Anderson, Michael Avery, Cathy Esson, Murray Aitken and Lisa Houghton.
This week's Picture from the Past comes from the Leader archives of March 1992. It shows Arduthie Primary School P1 pupils after they successfully hatched chickens in an incubator and then house them in an improvised run. They are named l-r as Alison Emslie, Sophie Hunt, Karen Anderson, Michael Avery, Cathy Esson, Murray Aitken and Lisa Houghton.

We take a look back at what was making the headlines locally on this week in 1992, 1967 and 1917.

25 YEARS AGO

Friday March 20th 1992

Portlethen Girl Guides have once again been plunged into crisis, with the 2nd Co. in real danger of folding unless a replacement Guider-in-Charge can be found before the end of this month.

The Guides were facing closure at the end of last year - until Stonehaven resident Mrs Alison Dyson offered to save the Company. But Mrs Dyson - who has three children, one of them a five month-old baby - only took the post on condition that she would receive back-up.

That back-up has not been forthcoming, and with the imminent departure of Assistant Guider Mrs Jacqueline Morris, Mrs Dyson will be unable to continue.

Now District Commissioner Mrs Anne McNair is pleading for help. The 2nd Co. is the only Guide unit in Portlethenand is so popular that organisers have been forced to compile a waiting list. But if no help is offered, the full quota of 36 members, aged 12 to 14, will be left with nowhere to go.

Mrs Dyson, however, will not completely relinquish her interest in the Guides. She may be willing to return at a future date if sufficient adult interest can be generated.

***

After defending himself against knife, gun and a group attack last week, Stonehaven karate instructor Ian McGregor has been awarded 2nd Dan Black Belt status in the freestyle martial art of kafdo karate.

50 YEARS AGO

Friday March 24th 1967

High winds blew so much sand across the road leading to Catterline from the main Stonehaven-Inverbervie coast road at the weekend that the side road had to be closed.

The road between Roadside of Catterline and Mill of Barras was closed from Sunday to Monday because of sand blown from fields on the farm of Brigstanes. About a quarter of a mile of the roadway was affected.

The sand, in places about two feet deep, was so fine that Kincardine roadmen, working in near sandstorm conditions, had to use a mechanical digger.

It cleared between 20 and 30 loads of sand on Monday, and was called in again on Tuesday.

On Sunday the high wind, whipping up the fine sand, made it impossible for the roadmen to work. Mr W. J. Argo, Harvieston, Kinneff, said the wind swept a large amount of top-soil from the fields, and in one part he had to completely re-sow the area.

***

We hav received the following letter signed by ex-Provost Hugh Ramsay and Lieut.-Commander A.G. Mitchell, chairman and C.O. respectively of the Stonehaven Unit of the Sea Cadet Corps:

“The Stonehaven Sea Cadet Unit is delighted to receive the anonymous donation of £10 in honour of the unit’s achievement in winning the Canada Trophy for the third successive year”.

100 YEARS AGO

Thursday March 22nd 1917

The weather during the past week has again been very stormy.

In the weekend the wind got round into the north, and for the past three days the temperature has been low, with biting northern blasts. On Tuesday there were frequent showers of snow, and yesterday the storm increased rather than slackened, and heavy falls took place at short intervals throughout the day. Last night there was a hard frost, and the streets were covered with a coating of ice which made “peramulation a painful performance”.

***

It is not every concert that succeeds in filling every square inch of available standing and sitting room in the spacious Town Hall of Stonehaven, but this feat was easily performed by the local branches of the BWTA on Friday last.

By the time of opening the hall was crowded in every part, and latecomers had to be content with an occasional glimpse of the platform from the side doors or had to go away disappointed. It is estimated that almost 800 persons paid for admission, and with the wounded soldiers and the platform party the number of those present must have easily topped the thousand. The way in which the stewardesses managed to arrange their audience in spite of the vast numbers was a revelation.