More than a quarter of Scots can’t remember last time they took up a new hobby

The BHF can reveal one of top ten hobbies we are most likely to have given up from childhood are playing a musical instrument (39 per cent).
The BHF can reveal one of top ten hobbies we are most likely to have given up from childhood are playing a musical instrument (39 per cent).

New statistics show 93 per cent of adults in Scotland have given up at least one hobby from their childhood and more than a quarter (26 per cent) can’t remember the last time they took up a new one.

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) is encouraging people to shake things up by reviving an old hobby they used to enjoy, or starting a new one, to help raise money for life saving heart research.

The poll showed that more than a quarter (26 per cent) said they can’t remember the last time they took up a new hobby or tried something different, and as for the hobbies they did in childhood, almost two in five (38 per cent) said the last time they did them was over 10 years ago.

For more than a third (34 per cent) it has been over 16 years.

Of the Scottish residents polled, almost two thirds (61 per cent) said they used to try more new things when they were younger, while almost a third (32 per cent) of adults say they have grown up to be someone who tends to say no to new things.

The BHF can reveal the top ten hobbies we are most likely to have given up from childhood are:

Musical Instruments (39 per cent)

Football (26 per cent)

Swimming (23 per cent)

Cycling (20 per cent)

Other sports (17 per cent)

Drawing (16 per cent)

Gymnastics (13 per cent)

Painting (13 per cent)

Arts and crafts (13 per cent)

Dance (13 per cent)

Almost two thirds (61 per cent) surveyed said they would like to re-engage with an old hobby given the chance, seeing the benefits. More than two in five (42 per cent) said it would give them a sense of fulfilment. Almost half (47 per cent) said it would be fun and almost a third (29 per cent) said that introducing a new hobby into their life would take their mind away from life stresses.

One of the main reasons people said they haven’t rekindled an old hobby is that they were just lacking the motivation. However, the BHF suggest that doing something to raise money in the fight against heart disease could be a good incentive to revive one of your favourite pastimes.

Marc Shaw, fundraising manager at the BHF, said: “Taking up a hobby can be extremely fulfilling, and can be a great way of keeping active and meeting new people. Our survey shows that the majority of us would love to reignite an old passion from their childhood/younger years, as many of us used to be much more open to trying new things when we were younger.

“By taking up an activity you used to enjoy, you can help raise money for our life saving research and help us make a difference to the millions of people fighting a daily battle with heart disease.”

The BHF relies on the enormous generosity of its supporters to continue funding life saving research, and is calling on the public to fundraise in ways that they enjoy. Do that thing you do, and do it to raise money to save lives.

Why not get the family involved, make opportunities to re-engage with that hobby that you used to enjoy, even just for one day, and fundraise for the BHF in the process.

It could be a taking on a swim challenge if you haven’t taken the plunge for a while or getting on your bike if you miss the wind in your hair. Gather together your friends and old teammates for a kick around or even hold an arts and crafts day where you can all get creative.

Around 670,000 people in Scotland are living with heart and circulatory disease. Heart disease devastates the lives of millions of people across the UK, often without warning, so why not get together and make the time to host a fundraiser or take on a challenge of your choice.

Get your free fundraising pack with ideas/inspiration, materials and support by visiting bhf.org.uk/doyourthing