Dramatic footage donated to Tolbooth

Neil Horne with Museum volunteer Tom Macpherson handing over the footage
Neil Horne with Museum volunteer Tom Macpherson handing over the footage

Volunteers at Stonehaven’s popular Tolbooth Museum are hoping the latest attraction will “go down a storm” with visitors.

The harbour museum has been presented with a dramatic video showing the gigantic waves that swept the harbour and shoreline on October 7, 2014, causing flooding and devastation to property.

The short film was made and handed over to the museum by retired Stonehaven journalist Neil Horne who was twice soaked capturing the drama that day.

Mr Horne, 68, said: “I could hear the waves thundering from my house in Evan Street so I took my video camera and went down the lane to the boardwalk and started filming.

“The waves were crashing over the harbour breakwater higher than I had ever seen them and the surf was hammering into the shore.

“As I filmed it got worse. One minute I was on dry land and the next thing I was up to my knees in water.”

Brian Doyle sent us this picture of the giant waves in October 2014

Brian Doyle sent us this picture of the giant waves in October 2014

Undeterred, Mr Horne moved to the harbour to capture more footage of the tempest.

He added: “Here the waves were enormous, the water was swamping the jetties and a few boats had been wrecked at their moorings. I was filming from the road near the inner harbour when suddenly a huge wave hit and I was soaked again.”

He then went to get a higher view from the Bervie Braes where he had a third accident.

“As I came off the pavement onto the cliff edge I slipped on the muddy slope and ended up flat on my back - with me and the camera clarted in mud. I cleaned it off as best I could and caught some more dramatic footage of the storm.”

After editing the film it appeared on Youtube and the Facebook page Stonehaven When You Were A Kid. It was seen by Stonehaven hairdresser and amateur photographer Martin Sim who suggested Neil should offer it to the Tolbooth Museum.

Museum volunteer Tom Macpherson, who is in charge of the museum’s video collection, said: “This is an excellent dramatic addition to our local footage. I will add it on to our film about the fireballs and it will play on a loop on the big screen for visitors to enjoy.”