Plan to protect artefacts

House of Dun Emergency Response and Salvage Plan. 

Andy Thompson Photography for National Trust for Scotland.
House of Dun Emergency Response and Salvage Plan. Andy Thompson Photography for National Trust for Scotland.

Scottish Fire and Rescue has joined forces with the National Trust for Scotland to help protect the country’s buildings and rare artefacts in the event of an emergency.

The National Trust for Scotland’s built heritage and their important collections of artwork, furniture and historic artefacts will be better protected in the event of something like a fire, thanks to the new partnership.

Under the programme which was announced this week at the House of Dun, Angus, local fire crews will have remote access to detailed plans for Trust properties in their area, including priority objects that should be saved first in the event of a major incident.

The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service will also work with staff at properties across Scotland to run emergency exercises that will help them to refine the emergency response plans for their property.

Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Group Manager Bruce Farquharson, who has been involved in the partnership, said:

“The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service is proud to be working closely with the National Trust for Scotland to help better protect the country’s most valuable pieces and buildings”.

A test exercise took place in Aberdeenshire at Fyvie Castle last year, simulating a major fire. The Trust will also be hosting familiarisation visits for local fire crews at all of its properties, to help them better understand the sometimes complex layout of old buildings that have developed over centuries, as well as seeing some of the collection pieces.